Copy Scores question added to FAQ page

Campus Instruction Feature 1837The FAQ page for Teachers On Campus has been updated.

There are lots of reasons a student’s schedule might change mid-term. Maybe there was a mistake and fixing it causes a domino effect of changes. Maybe a teacher recommended a switch out of one class and into an honors or accelerated class. Maybe the counselor is just trying to balance numbers so you don’t have 43 in your first hour and 20 in your third hour. Those changes could also happen any time. Continue reading “Copy Scores question added to FAQ page”

Campus Learning makes scoring Google submissions easy

Goodbye Google Classroom! Now you can do it all with Campus Learning.  

I used Google Classroom with sixth graders. There were things I liked about it and things I didn’t like. I didn’t like how hard it was to implement standards-based grading. How could I align an assignment to more than one standard and provide scores for each standard separately? Google Classroom also made me use points for everything. If you use standards-based grading and want your score to align to multiple standards, you have to add them up instead and figure out a different way to communicate different scores. If your district uses something other than points, what do you do then? I also didn’t like the double entry of scores. Not only is double entry double the work, but it adds another opportunity to make mistakes.    Continue reading “Campus Learning makes scoring Google submissions easy”

Welcome back!

Welcome back to a new school year!

I hope your school year is off to a great start – and you were able to come back refreshed, ready and able to find everything you stashed away in June so it wouldn’t get lost over the summer. I’d like to offer a start of the year refresher on how Campus works. I’m including an introduction to Campus Community and a quick list of FAQs since it has been a while. Continue reading “Welcome back!”

Finding Money

Teachers often have big plans and big ideas at the beginning of the school year, but there isn’t always money to make those plans a reality. Luckily, there are options available for teachers to help fund those projects in addition to grants and teacher stores. They include one I got to see in action first hand last year, DonorsChoose.org. Continue reading “Finding Money”

Growth Mindset Part 2

Your role as a teacher

Growth mindsets are important for students (for more information on growth mindsets for students, see  this blog post), but just as important is your understanding of your own mindset as their teacher.

Good intentions can backfire

We know teacher interactions with students are important. You want to have a positive impact on students’ lives – that’s why you’re a teacher. Continue reading “Growth Mindset Part 2”

Use Student Data with Score Analysis

Individualize instruction based on the newest data in your Campus Grade Book

I don’t even know how many ways I tried to use formative data in my classes in a timely way. It was so hard because it took so much time. Even if my assessment

Nav-Getting Started 3
Click here to see how to access Score Analysis

was short and easy to score, sorting those scores and analyzing the results piece by piece to look for gaps in understanding took time. Sometimes I would only get through one or two periods worth before I had to get myself home, make supper, and go to bed. Then I’d need to be in my classroom at 6 a.m. to try to finish the rest or hope I could whip through them during my prep, provided I didn’t need to cover another teacher’s class. Sometimes I would just apply the weaknesses of first hour to the sections later in the day, foregoing the idea of individualization for hoping I was meeting the needs of most. Continue reading “Use Student Data with Score Analysis”

Growth Mindset changed my classes

Teaching growth mindset can change the culture of a class.

 

Last year, I was part of a team of teachers who decided to spend a week of our homeroom/advisory time teaching sixth graders about growth mindset. Our decision to teach about mindsets was made toward the end of the school year in an effort to respond to some of the negative fixed mindsets we were noticing. While I would recommend starting the year with an introduction to growth mindset with follow up throughout the year, even starting it three-quarters of the way through, we saw positive changes! All of the students in the sixth grade received the same message about challenging themselves and being more aware of their learning. If a task was particularly easy for a student, others in the class would remind them to challenge themselves. It was the beginning of a change in culture.

What is Growth Mindset?

Continue reading “Growth Mindset changed my classes”